The Showbear Family Circus

is a big tent

An academic journal, a literary journal, a digital library of art that sometimes streams film and music, and — once in a blue moon — a newspaper.

Two values govern our selections: publishing liberal arts focused on moral law and virtue ethics.

1. The liberal arts govern what we like to publish. We want pieces grounded in logic, grammar, and rhetoric per se — that is we want pieces that are well-reasoned (the creator is thinking clearly and coherently), well-articulated (the creator is helping us to think precisely what she thinks), and beautiful (the creator is composing so as to make us feel what she feels and persuade us that her view is correct, good, and gorgeous). We seldom cave to academese, monotonous purple prose in the absence of moving narrative, art that adds to the noise and nihilism of our present state, or reporting that simply tears down all the contributions its subjects have made to thought and public service. If you do not understand the classical definition of the liberal arts and think we mean merely painting and fiction, we encourage you to read Dr. Cirilla’s Liberal Arts Definition.

Short of that, we assume the highest end of art and science moves towards meta-thought about ultimate reality, The Good, The True, The Beautiful. Metaphysical assumptions undergird every other art and science. Creative writing (fiction, poetry, essay) forms the crossroads of the arts and sciences, for in them logic, grammar, and rhetoric form a sort of parallel world wherein we play with the real hypotheses behind every other art and science. From there we publish fine art that makes us think and feel (visual, music, film, etc.), academic pieces on the arts of application (medicine, law, sciences, etc.), and reporting or practical ideas and innovative designs in the arts of production (farming, 3D printing, book binding, etc.).

We do this because we hope to reorder common ways magazines and readers think about news, scientific research, creative writing, and art reviews. We want all of the work shared at the Showbear Circus to focus not on money, power, lauds, or pleasure but on whether the thing made, the thought reasoned, and the feeling felt are good and beautiful and true.

Therefore we accept very broadly in terms of genres, but we have two long term goals: why we publish and how we publish.

2. Moral law and virtue ethics govern our ends: why we publish. We assume all cultures adhere to moral — that is natural — law (some proof here) and we seek pieces that build up civil society towards that end, rather than tear her down. We want virtue and moral law back in our disciplines and sectors of society. You might pull from Plato's civic virtue or the moral law of the Tao or Tanakh or Jesus or Boethius or Cicero, doesn't really matter to us because the virtues and morals work in parallel and comment on one another. What matters is that you're orienting your discipline and sector of society around virtue and morality. As for virtue ethics, we simply mean that the habits of what is good and sincere quest for wisdom matters more to us than mere hypotheticals and sophistry: the most brilliant ethicist in the world can be a scoundrel if he’s out of practice, the most brilliant scientist in the world can become a tyrant if in his quest to triumph over nature he merely triumphs over his fellow man with nature as the instrument. We want to make it easier to be good and to better ourselves in the process.

That in mind, all submissions must adhere to a PG-14 rating for the sake of the breadth of our audience. Hard F, C, B words, sexually explicit imagery, grotesque violence that does not clearly critique violence per se, etc. — these and related submissions will be automatically rejected if the cover letter does not give clear logical cause for the inclusion of such content because it will harm our search engine rating. Save us both time and money by keeping our audience in mind.

That’s the circus. We don’t take ourselves seriously, as the big tent metaphor implies, but we’re dead serious about our goals for the sake of the artists and thinkers in our lives.

Keep reading, making, submitting, and subscribing.

But most of all, keep juggling fire.

Lancelot


DO NOT make multiple submissions: send us one thing at a time unless you’re submitting to a regular column. 


IF you’re submitting music, film, art, a stage play or other similar works, please realize that we are only featuring work already completed. We’re taking on zero new projects through this portal when it comes to production, directing, collaborating, or agenting. If one of us is looking for any of that, our personal websites (excepting Lancelot Schaubert’s, of course) will say so and our submission guidelines for production, collaboration, and agenting will remain separate from this portal.

IF YOU ARE A REAL LIVE SENTIENT JUGGLING BEAR, CONTACT US IMMEDIATELY.

Otherwise, carry on...


The Showbear Family Circus

is a big tent


An academic journal, a literary journal, a digital library of art that sometimes streams film and music, and — once in a blue moon — a newspaper.

Two values govern our selections: publishing liberal arts focused on moral law and virtue ethics.


1. The liberal arts govern what we like to publish. We want pieces grounded in logic, grammar, and rhetoric per se — that is we want pieces that are well-reasoned (the creator is thinking clearly and coherently), well-articulated (the creator is helping us to think precisely what she thinks), and beautiful (the creator is composing so as to make us feel what she feels and persuade us that her view is correct, good, and gorgeous). We seldom cave to academese, monotonous purple prose in the absence of moving narrative, art that adds to the noise and nihilism of our present state, or reporting that simply tears down all the contributions its subjects have made to thought and public service. If you do not understand the classical definition of the liberal arts and think we mean merely painting and fiction, we encourage you to read Dr. Cirilla’s Liberal Arts Definition.


Short of that, we assume the highest end of art and science moves towards meta-thought about ultimate reality, The Good, The True, The Beautiful. Metaphysical assumptions undergird every other art and science. Creative writing (fiction, poetry, essay) forms the crossroads of the arts and sciences, for in them logic, grammar, and rhetoric form a sort of parallel world wherein we play with the real hypotheses behind every other art and science. From there we publish fine art that makes us think and feel (visual, music, film, etc.), academic pieces on the arts of application (medicine, law, sciences, etc.), and reporting or practical ideas and innovative designs in the arts of production (farming, 3D printing, book binding, etc.).


We do this because we hope to reorder common ways magazines and readers think about news, scientific research, creative writing, and art reviews. We want all of the work shared at the Showbear Circus to focus not on money, power, lauds, or pleasure but on whether the thing made, the thought reasoned, and the feeling felt are good and beautiful and true.


Therefore we accept very broadly in terms of genres, but we have two long term goals: why we publish and how we publish.


2. Moral law and virtue ethics govern our ends: why we publish. We assume all cultures adhere to moral — that is natural — law (some proof here) and we seek pieces that build up civil society towards that end, rather than tear her down. We want virtue and moral law back in our disciplines and sectors of society. You might pull from Plato's civic virtue or the moral law of the Tao or Tanakh or Jesus or Boethius or Cicero, doesn't really matter to us because the virtues and morals work in parallel and comment on one another. What matters is that you're orienting your discipline and sector of society around virtue and morality. As for virtue ethics, we simply mean that the habits of what is good and sincere quest for wisdom matters more to us than mere hypotheticals and sophistry: the most brilliant ethicist in the world can be a scoundrel if he’s out of practice, the most brilliant scientist in the world can become a tyrant if in his quest to triumph over nature he merely triumphs over his fellow man with nature as the instrument. We want to make it easier to be good and to better ourselves in the process.


That in mind, all submissions must adhere to a PG-14 rating for the sake of the breadth of our audience. Hard F, C, B words, sexually explicit imagery, grotesque violence that does not clearly critique violence per se, etc. — these and related submissions will be automatically rejected if the cover letter does not give clear logical cause for the inclusion of such content because it will harm our search engine rating. Save us both time and money by keeping our audience in mind.



That’s the circus. We don’t take ourselves seriously, as the big tent metaphor implies, but we’re dead serious about our goals for the sake of the artists and thinkers in our lives.

Keep reading, making, submitting, and subscribing.

But most of all, keep juggling fire.

Lancelot


500-word Flash Fiction


For this category, you're submitting to the 500-Word Flash Fiction section. ONLY SUBMIT PIECES UNDER 500 WORDS. We prefer fiction to focus less on exposing problems (there's plenty of that in American fiction) and more on upholding the virtues of various sectors of society. All genres welcome, but we'll pretty much auto-reject extreme instances of sex and violence or crass language that would suit a PG-12 audience simply because of how that restricts our placement in search engines.

 

The Deets:
 

  • Wordcount — 500 words.
  • Format — As you'll see elsewhere, we mock sticklers for status quo. However, standard manuscript format always puts us in a good mood. Just because we're a team full of technological anarchists doesn't mean we're neanderthals... except for Girbog Smashclub. Quite the charmer, Girbog. Quite the socialite.
  • Bona fides — If you've published elsewhere, please let us know. Don't assume we've heard of your work because books are many, life is short, languages evolve, the number of submitters grow every year due to a mixup in our potions department, and sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito or read Homer than keep up on the shifting fortunes of we literati. Or sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito while reading the library's ancient copy of Homer so that the burrito's salsa verde drips on the page. NOT that this has ever happened to any of us before in real life. Twice. Anyways, send a thorough bio.
  • Rights: Digital rights in perpetuity with the option to record audio for podcasts and reprint in an anthology. You may have your work put behind the Patreon higher Member tiers in order to help fund future writers. 

  
 

For our Small Stories for Kids, you must be under 12 years old and writing a piece under 500 words — you or your parent can submit, but it needs to be a fictional story written (preferably handwritten — attach image) by a child.


Due to an overwhelming response in submissions, we will only be open for general free categories five days of every month. Submittable, however, requires us to charge a minimum of $2 per submission after our free 100, so until we have ~250 subscribers, we won’t be able to afford their higher tier.


The Showbear Family Circus

is a big tent

An academic journal, a literary journal, a digital library of art that sometimes streams film and music, and — once in a blue moon — a newspaper.

Two values govern our selections: publishing liberal arts focused on moral law and virtue ethics.

1. The liberal arts govern what we like to publish. We want pieces grounded in logic, grammar, and rhetoric per se — that is we want pieces that are well-reasoned (the creator is thinking clearly and coherently), well-articulated (the creator is helping us to think precisely what she thinks), and beautiful (the creator is composing so as to make us feel what she feels and persuade us that her view is correct, good, and gorgeous). We seldom cave to academese, monotonous purple prose in the absence of moving narrative, art that adds to the noise and nihilism of our present state, or reporting that simply tears down all the contributions its subjects have made to thought and public service. If you do not understand the classical definition of the liberal arts and think we mean merely painting and fiction, we encourage you to read Dr. Cirilla’s Liberal Arts Definition.

Short of that, we assume the highest end of art and science moves towards meta-thought about ultimate reality, The Good, The True, The Beautiful. Metaphysical assumptions undergird every other art and science. Creative writing (fiction, poetry, essay) forms the crossroads of the arts and sciences, for in them logic, grammar, and rhetoric form a sort of parallel world wherein we play with the real hypotheses behind every other art and science. From there we publish fine art that makes us think and feel (visual, music, film, etc.), academic pieces on the arts of application (medicine, law, sciences, etc.), and reporting or practical ideas and innovative designs in the arts of production (farming, 3D printing, book binding, etc.).

We do this because we hope to reorder common ways magazines and readers think about news, scientific research, creative writing, and art reviews. We want all of the work shared at the Showbear Circus to focus not on money, power, lauds, or pleasure but on whether the thing made, the thought reasoned, and the feeling felt are good and beautiful and true.

Therefore we accept very broadly in terms of genres, but we have two long term goals: why we publish and how we publish.

2. Moral law and virtue ethics govern our ends: why we publish. We assume all cultures adhere to moral — that is natural — law (some proof here) and we seek pieces that build up civil society towards that end, rather than tear her down. We want virtue and moral law back in our disciplines and sectors of society. You might pull from Plato's civic virtue or the moral law of the Tao or Tanakh or Jesus or Boethius or Cicero, doesn't really matter to us because the virtues and morals work in parallel and comment on one another. What matters is that you're orienting your discipline and sector of society around virtue and morality. As for virtue ethics, we simply mean that the habits of what is good and sincere quest for wisdom matters more to us than mere hypotheticals and sophistry: the most brilliant ethicist in the world can be a scoundrel if he’s out of practice, the most brilliant scientist in the world can become a tyrant if in his quest to triumph over nature he merely triumphs over his fellow man with nature as the instrument. We want to make it easier to be good and to better ourselves in the process.

That in mind, all submissions must adhere to a PG-14 rating for the sake of the breadth of our audience. Hard F, C, B words, sexually explicit imagery, grotesque violence that does not clearly critique violence per se, etc. — these and related submissions will be automatically rejected if the cover letter does not give clear logical cause for the inclusion of such content because it will harm our search engine rating. Save us both time and money by keeping our audience in mind.

That’s the circus. We don’t take ourselves seriously, as the big tent metaphor implies, but we’re dead serious about our goals for the sake of the artists and thinkers in our lives.

Keep reading, making, submitting, and subscribing.

But most of all, keep juggling fire.

Lancelot

Small Stories for Kids.

If you aren't under twelve, don't submit your story. That's it.

The Deets:

  • Wordcount — 500 words or less
  • Format — As you'll see elsewhere, we mock sticklers for status quo. However, standard manuscript format always puts us in a good mood. Just because we're a team full of technological anarchists doesn't mean we're neanderthals... except for Girbog Smashclub. Quite the charmer, Girbog. Quite the socialite.
  • Bona fides — If you've published elsewhere, please let us know. Don't assume we've heard of your work because books are many, life is short, languages evolve, the number of submitters grow every year due to a mixup in our potions department, and sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito or read Homer than keep up on the shifting fortunes of we literati. Or sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito while reading the library's ancient copy of Homer so that the burrito's salsa verde drips on the page. NOT that this has ever happened to any of us before in real life. Twice. Anyways, send a thorough bio.
  • Rights: Digital rights in perpetuity with the option to record audio for podcasts and reprint in an anthology.
     
$10.00

If you believe that you have more than one piece for submission — as in a series — you may pitch a regular column here. 


  • The fee to do so is $10 — we want to deter those who are bulk-submitting to every free portal on Submittable and winnow it to those who are seriously committed to contributing regularly. 
  • You may pitch a regular column for any category. We want your first two articles submitted in a single Word document accompanied with titles and one-line pitches for your first ten posts. 
  • For fiction and other narrative: consider submitting a longer work that can be subdivided serially into chapters. A 40,000-word novella would work great as 10 weeks of 4,000 words apiece. 


Due to an overwhelming response in submissions, we will only be open for general free categories five days of every month. Submittable, however, requires us to charge a minimum of $2 per submission after our free 100, so until we have ~250 subscribers, we won’t be able to afford their higher tier.


The Showbear Family Circus

is a big tent

An academic journal, a literary journal, a digital library of art that sometimes streams film and music, and — once in a blue moon — a newspaper.

Two values govern our selections: publishing liberal arts focused on moral law and virtue ethics.

1. The liberal arts govern what we like to publish. We want pieces grounded in logic, grammar, and rhetoric per se — that is we want pieces that are well-reasoned (the creator is thinking clearly and coherently), well-articulated (the creator is helping us to think precisely what she thinks), and beautiful (the creator is composing so as to make us feel what she feels and persuade us that her view is correct, good, and gorgeous). We seldom cave to academese, monotonous purple prose in the absence of moving narrative, art that adds to the noise and nihilism of our present state, or reporting that simply tears down all the contributions its subjects have made to thought and public service. If you do not understand the classical definition of the liberal arts and think we mean merely painting and fiction, we encourage you to read Dr. Cirilla’s Liberal Arts Definition.

Short of that, we assume the highest end of art and science moves towards meta-thought about ultimate reality, The Good, The True, The Beautiful. Metaphysical assumptions undergird every other art and science. Creative writing (fiction, poetry, essay) forms the crossroads of the arts and sciences, for in them logic, grammar, and rhetoric form a sort of parallel world wherein we play with the real hypotheses behind every other art and science. From there we publish fine art that makes us think and feel (visual, music, film, etc.), academic pieces on the arts of application (medicine, law, sciences, etc.), and reporting or practical ideas and innovative designs in the arts of production (farming, 3D printing, book binding, etc.).

We do this because we hope to reorder common ways magazines and readers think about news, scientific research, creative writing, and art reviews. We want all of the work shared at the Showbear Circus to focus not on money, power, lauds, or pleasure but on whether the thing made, the thought reasoned, and the feeling felt are good and beautiful and true.

Therefore we accept very broadly in terms of genres, but we have two long term goals: why we publish and how we publish.

2. Moral law and virtue ethics govern our ends: why we publish. We assume all cultures adhere to moral — that is natural — law (some proof here) and we seek pieces that build up civil society towards that end, rather than tear her down. We want virtue and moral law back in our disciplines and sectors of society. You might pull from Plato's civic virtue or the moral law of the Tao or Tanakh or Jesus or Boethius or Cicero, doesn't really matter to us because the virtues and morals work in parallel and comment on one another. What matters is that you're orienting your discipline and sector of society around virtue and morality. As for virtue ethics, we simply mean that the habits of what is good and sincere quest for wisdom matters more to us than mere hypotheticals and sophistry: the most brilliant ethicist in the world can be a scoundrel if he’s out of practice, the most brilliant scientist in the world can become a tyrant if in his quest to triumph over nature he merely triumphs over his fellow man with nature as the instrument. We want to make it easier to be good and to better ourselves in the process.

That in mind, all submissions must adhere to a PG-14 rating for the sake of the breadth of our audience. Hard F, C, B words, sexually explicit imagery, grotesque violence that does not clearly critique violence per se, etc. — these and related submissions will be automatically rejected if the cover letter does not give clear logical cause for the inclusion of such content because it will harm our search engine rating. Save us both time and money by keeping our audience in mind.

That’s the circus. We don’t take ourselves seriously, as the big tent metaphor implies, but we’re dead serious about our goals for the sake of the artists and thinkers in our lives.

Keep reading, making, submitting, and subscribing.

But most of all, keep juggling fire.

Lancelot

The Deets:

  • Wordcount — 1,000 — 10,000 words per piece
  • Format — As you'll see elsewhere, we mock sticklers for status quo. However, standard manuscript format always puts us in a good mood. Just because we're a team full of technological anarchists doesn't mean we're neanderthals... except for Girbog Smashclub. Quite the charmer, Girbog. Quite the socialite.
  • Bona fides — If you've published elsewhere, please let us know. Don't assume we've heard of your work because books are many, life is short, languages evolve, the number of submitters grow every year due to a mixup in our potions department, and sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito or read Homer than keep up on the shifting fortunes of we literati. Or sometimes we'd rather eat a burrito while reading the library's ancient copy of Homer so that the burrito's salsa verde drips on the page. NOT that this has ever happened to any of us before in real life. Twice. Anyways, send a thorough bio.
  • Rights: Digital rights in perpetuity with the option to record audio for podcasts and reprint in an anthology.
The Showbear Family Circus